Lemon the Duck

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by Laura Backman
illustrated by Laurence Cleyet-Merle Lobster Press, 2008
ISBN-10: 1897550251
ISBN-13: 978-1897550250
32 pp, color illus., ages 4-10
Lemon the Duck is born in an incubator in Ms. Lake's classroom along with three siblings. Ms. Lake's students, who have been studying oviparous animals, care for the ducklings and delight in their development. Although the other ducklings thrive, Lemon is unable to stand or walk on her own and is diagnosed with a neurological balance problem. Ms Lake and her students adopt Lemon when the other ducklings go to live on a farm, and try to find ways to make her more independent. This delightful story of how a group of school children and their teacher care for a duck with special needs is based on a true story of the real Lemon the Duck. It has obvious applications for discussions about differences, the value of each individual and caring for others who need help, but it is such a great story with such wonderful illustrations, that children and teachers will love it for those reasons alone. For more information about Lemon the Duck and lots of ducky jokes and sayings, visit www.lemontheduck.com.


Text Review:
Lemon the Duck by Laura Backman December 19, 2009 by AmyF
If you look like a duck and quack like a duck, you must be a duck. What if you can't walk or move like a duck? Are you still a duck? Ms. Lake's class has been watching four eggs in an incubator and they just hatched. What happens when they discover that one is not quite right? Will they care for the duckling even though it looks and acts different than the others? Will they try to better the duckling's life? Lemon the Duck is a heartwarming story that will win many hearts. Lemon is a duckling born with physical disabilities. Together with her human classmates she will deal with not only her special needs, but the separation with her family and overcoming obstacles that stop her from functioning as a normal duckling. Author Laura Backman takes the subject of special needs and brings it to a kid's level of understanding. This book is a great way to introduce your child to this topic. The caring and compassion of Ms. Lake's class will inspire the whole family to reconsider how they view others. And if you are a family with a special needs child and looking for a book to explain these needs to a sibling, this is the book for you. From the moment you open the book, your child will engage in the needs of this duckling and the role Ms. Lake's class partakes in it. Lemon the Duck is an inspiring story to share with all. You can meet Lemon on her on:

Top-rated children’s picture book about special needs

As parents we want to influence our children positively by teaching them that all people are unique and wonderful in and of themselves. Accepting others for who they are is an important part of proper growth and development. There is a top-rated kid’s picture book that takes children on an adventure with a classroom and their desire to help a beloved duck named Lemon. Based on the author’s real-life experience with her pet duck, Laura Backman cleverly endears us to Lemon and teaches the reader the rewards of perseverance and acceptance. For those children who personally experience a special need that requires them to move around uniquely, Lemon the Duck will become a treasured read. Those children who know or spend their classroom time with a friend who has difficulty walking, Lemon the Duck will give insight and understanding.

Cheer along with Lemon as she strengthens her muscles and marvel at the resilience of the children who just want to help Lemon to walk. This award-winning children’s picture book is a must in every household for it allows children to become a part of a journey of hope and endurance. Laura Backman based Lemon the Duck on her own real-life experience with her pet duck, Lemon. This top-rated children’s picture book shares the struggles and triumphs of a little duck born with a balance problem. Lemon needed special attention and Ms. Lake’s class accepted the responsibility fully. Quack loudly with the children as they experiment and finally find a way for Lemon to muck around in the grass with the other ducks. It is a heartfelt journey for a group of children who learn a great deal of love from Lemon the Duck.

WATERLOO REGION RECORD

LEMON THE DUCK

by Laura Backman; illustrated by Laurence Cleyet-Merle)

When a classroom egg-hatching experiment produces a nestful of fluffy, yellow ducklings, the children in Mrs. Lake's class are overjoyed. It doesn't take long for them to notice, however, that one of their new feathered friends can't stand up or even stretch out her neck.

Lemon is as yellow as meringue pie, with a tuft of white feathers on the top of her head. She requires extra special care to eat, to go for walks and to have a bath.

Together, the children brainstorm to see if there are ways they can make life easier for this disabled duck. Their enterprising solution gives Lemon a new lease on life.

Rhode Island teacher Laura Backman's real-life experience in taking Lemon under her wing became the basis for this beautiful tale of love and caring, suitable for children ages three to seven.

Visit www.lemontheduck.com to see photos and videos of Lemon.

By Brenda Hoerle, WATERLOO REGION RECORD

Mom Central

Lemon the Duck
Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Many children's books are important not just in their ability to nurture bonds between parent and child or expose kids to the joy of reading, but because they relay a message or teach an important lesson. A new book, Lemon the Duck, written by Laura Backman, goes above and beyond even this. This story not only delivers messages (about accepting disabilities and uniqueness, the benefits of offering both help and encouragement, and achieving goals), but it also tells the heartwarming story of Lemon, a duck who is unable to stand up, based on the author's experiences with the real Lemon the duck.
The story follows Lemon from the very beginning, when she was born into a classroom of students who, after discovering her disability, do their best to take care of her. What follows is a tale of hope and love, as the children do all they can for Lemon as she struggles to be independent and fit in with the other ducks.
The touching and adorable story is complimented by Laurence Cleyet-Merle's beautiful illustrations. The colorful and vivid pictures and sweet story are sure to impress everyone, children and adults alike. This book deserves a place of honor on every children's bookshelf.

________________ CM . . . . Volume XV Number 3. . . .September 26, 2008

cover

Lemon the Duck.

Laura Backman. Illustrated by Laurence Cleyet-Merle.
Montreal, PQ: Lobster Press, 2008.
32 pp. hardcover, $19.95.
ISBN 978-1-897073-74-2.

Subject Heading:
Ducks-Juvenile fiction.

Preschool-grade 3 / Ages 4-8.

Review by Margaret Snow.

**** /4

   
In the story Lemon the Duck, Ms. Lake has a great new learning experience for her primary students... they are incubating four Pekin domestic duck eggs. On "the big day," Peaches, Chip Chip, Daisy and Lemon emerge. While the children celebrate their new found friends, they notice Lemon is different... she is unable to stand. As the story progresses, the reader learns Lemon has been born with neurological problems that will require "extra special care."

      While the other three ducks retire to Mr. Web's farm, Lemon lives with the teacher and becomes the class pet. Pushed in a stroller, Lemon commutes where she enjoys swimming in a tub and she is hand-fed worms. Yet still Lemon longs for the freedom to move about independently. The children work as a team experimenting and problem solving to give Lemon the best possible support in her quest for more autonomy. They try tying balloons to her, using a walker, propping her up with pillows, food temptation, but finally meet with success when student Holly notices a dog life jacket while helping to clean her garage at home. Back at school, the teacher slips Lemon's legs into the holes of the dog vest, the children hold the handles to assist with the weight, and VOILA, Lemon can walk upright for the first time. If the children are busy, they simply attach Lemon's carrier to a stand. She is finally able to move around on her own, observing what is happening around her, "mucking around in the ground (like all ducks love to do) "and even finding her own worms for the first time rather than being hand fed."

     A quiver of sadness begins as Nathaniel questions if this freedom means Lemon is now destined for Mr. Web's farm as well. Ms. Lake confirms that Lemon will always need them, to which Nathaniel's response is, "I think we need her too!"

     Laura Backman has done an incredible job of relating a personal experience that occurred in her primary classroom in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Children can easily identify with a variety of typical student character types found in the text. She has crafted a book where much can be learned about not only the basic development of "oviparous animals" (animals that lay eggs) but more importantly the value of an individual with special needs. Select phrases that incorporate the use of a variety of senses are sprinkled throughout the text, such as "mucking around," "chorus of quacking," "grandmother's lemon meringue pie," "burst out of their egg" and "peeping balls of fluff."

      Backman has subliminally added life lessons; for instance, disabilities do not make one less special, the importance of quality of life; goals can be achieved in creative ways when one has difficulties to overcome; and assistance is important but so is standing back to offer encouragement so that self-reliance and a sense of personal accomplishment might also be achieved.

Nathaniel showed the others how to feed her. "Hold the worm by Lemon's tail," he instructed. "Ms. Lake says Lemon needs to practice touching her oil gland so she can get stronger, and waterproof herself. It will keep her dry in the water."

internal art     Laurence Cleyet-Merle, from Marseille, France, has illustrated many books, magazines and even board games. His well drawn cartoon images are the perfect medium to capture the wide-eyed innocence of children looking at a special needs character for the first time. He has revealed a sense of wonder, concern, love and compassion in the facial expressions of both the children and the ducks. Both colour and light have been skillfully utilized to enhance the story with his quality art.

      Lemon the Duck supports primary curriculum and teachers might use this book with children to show:

  • a "SAFE WAY" to talk about disabilities
  • the importance of accepting individuals for what they can do
  • class team work
  • following through with a class project
  • the development of egg laying animals
  • the enhancement of a story by using descriptive phrases
  • vocabulary development
  • lessons on "Writing Traits" i.e. word choice, organization, voice, sentence fluency, ideas, conventions

     Not only is this an awesome story, but the reader can turn it into a real life experience. To do a follow up on Lemon, visit her website at www.lemontheduck.com. Here you cannot only see the nonfiction version of this tale unfold but also get updates on Lemon, complete with pictures, home video clips, poems, jokes, other stories of animal rescue, duckology and several newspaper articles featuring Lemon.

     To summarize, Lemon the Duck book is delightfully well-written, with excellent illustrations, and has a variety of purposes in a classroom. I highly recommend this book both for home and school use.

Highly Recommended.

Margaret Snow is a teacher librarian and Early Literacy teacher in a small school in Southwestern Ontario.

5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring, Joyful, and Thought-provoking, September 4, 2008
This is a joyful and thought-provoking book for all ages about how animals can cope with serious handicaps. I've witnessed my own critters make remarkable comebacks from serious illness and injury, including a blind turkey named Hazel. 'Lemon the Duck' is a chronicle of just this kind of courage. It's inspiring on the human side, too. Few people would go to the trouble of teaching a duck with neurological problems to stand up and feed on her own. Laura Backman and her students show how far love can go, and you have to wonder who benefited most - Lemon, or Laura and the children. Both the text and the superb illustrations make this book a must. - Bob Tarte, author of 'Enslaved by Ducks' and 'Fowl Weather.'

Wayne S. Walker, reviewer with Stories for Children, 09/01/2008

Richard was the first to hear the soft peeping sounds as the four duck eggs began to hatch in Ms. Lake's classroom. The children named the ducklings Peaches, Lemon, Daisy, and Chip-Chip. However, neurological issues made Lemon unable to walk. Ms. Lake contacted Dr. Bill the vet, who said that Lemon had a balance problem for which not much could be done. The other ducks went to live on Mr. Web's farm, but Ms. Lake and the students did what they could to give Lemon the extra special care that she needed to grow stronger. In the end, their creativity invented a solution for Lemon to visit with her siblings. This book is based on the inspirational true story of the author's real-life experience with a duck born in an elementary school classroom. It teaches not only about egg to duckling development but also about animals (and people) who are different and have special needs. Children need to remember that disabilities do not make anyone less special, and a book like this is a helpful way to impress such a lesson on their minds. It is a truly heart-warming story with lovely illustrations that I highly recommend.



Awards and Reviews

"A clever story about accepting and supporting those with life challenges ... The illustrations are adorable and the expressions on the faces of the children in the story as they ponder how to help the loveable Lemon can be used as discussion-starters." Library Media Connection, May 2009



"Backman has done an incredible job ... She has crafted a book where much can be learned about not only the basic development of oviparous animals, but more importantly the value of an individual with special needs ... Lemon the Duck supports primary curriculum and teachers might use this book with children to show a safe way to talk about disabilities ... delightfully well-written, with excellent illustrations, and a variety of purposes in a classroom." CM: Canadian Review of Materials, Sept. 2008



This delightful story of how a group of school children and their teacher care for a duck with special needs is based on a true story of the real Lemon the Duck. It has obvious applications for discussions about differences, the value of each individual and caring for others who need help, but it is such a great story with such wonderful illustrations that children and teachers will love it for those reasons alone.
Canadian Teacher Magazine, January 2009


This book is based on the inspirational true story of the author's real-life experience with a duck born in an elementary school classroom. It teaches not only about egg to duckling development but also about animals (and people) who are different and have special needs. Children need to remember that disabilities do not make anyone less special, and a book like this is a helpful way to impress such a lesson on their minds. It is a truly heart-warming story with lovely illustrations that I highly recommend.
Stories for Children, October 2008


"By caring for Lemon, the students shared in her triumphs and defeats, and learned about love and acceptance. Most important, the children discovered that disabilities and differences don't make a person or animal less special or valued." RI Catholic Magazine, Oct. 2008



Based on a real-life experience, Lemon's plight will tug at the heartstrings of young readers ... Whether this is read just for the story or seen as a teaching moment on the care of those with special needs, it is a warm and fuzzy tale.
Children's Literature, 2008



Lemon not only taught students about egg to duckling development, but also an important lesson about animals with special needs. Lemon is not a throw away duck, not a mistake, not a project gone wrong, but rather a very special duck with very special needs. Students learned a valuable life lesson from Lemon and from their teacher.
The Majestic Monthly

This is a joyful and thought-provoking book for all ages about how animals can cope with serious handicaps ... Lemon the Duck is a chronicle of just this kind of courage. It's inspiring on the human side, too. Few people would go to the trouble of teaching a duck with neurological problems to stand up and feed on her own. Laura Backman and her students show how far love can go ... Both the text and the superb illustrations make this book a must.
Bob Tarte, author of Enslaved by Ducks

... a big-hearted and colorful tale based on a true story. The students' love for the duckling, plus their problem-solving skills, eventually lead them to an ingenious solution that allows Lemon to participate fully in the life of the classroom and even in that of her siblings on the farm.
Montreal Review of Books, Fall 2008


The colorful and vivid pictures and sweet story are sure to impress everyone, children and adults alike. This book deserves a place of honor on every children's bookshelf.
MomCentral.com, Oct 2008



... lively artwork complements the hustle and bustle of the action in the story ... a tender story [that should be] in both school and public libraries.
Resource Links, November 2008



... [a] beautiful tale of love and caring, suitable for children ages three to seven.
Waterloo Region Record, Sept. 2008


Staff Pick: Where the Sidewalk Ends Bookstore, on Cape Cod, "LOVE this book. The sweetest tale of love, acceptance, and friendship despite differences. The cheerful and unique illustrations make this true story even more enjoyable." (April 2009)

* Recommended by Reading Rockets and by The Children's Better Health Institute's Turtle Magazine
* Lemon and Laura have been featured on the NPR program Here and Now, the NECN (New England Cable News) program, The Secret Life of Animals, MSNBC, WJAR-10 News Providence, WHDH-7 News Boston, Dream Readers; (Danvers, MA Community Access Television), Vibrant Living (Webradio.net), Pet Life Radio with Bob Tarte, as well as in a syndicated article by the Associated Press (article appeared in dozens of media outlets in the US and worldwide), TIME for Kids, Providence Journal, Boston Herald, Rhode Island Monthly Magazine, So Rhode Island Magazine, Newport Daily News, Fall River Herald News, Quincy Patriot Ledger, The Day (Connecticut), Majestic Monthly, New Bedford Standard Times, Sakonnet Times, RI Catholic, Stories for Children, Montreal Review of Books, CM: Canadian Review of Materials, Resource Links, South Carolina Orangeburg Times, SouthCoastToday.com, MomCentral.com, MyBackyardNews.com, WickedLocal.com (GateHouse Media New England), and HomeschoolBlogger.com.
* The story has also received media attention in Canada (English and French), the UK, Japan, Italy, Singapore, Germany, and Taiwan.
Selected (English and French editions), Approved List of Learning Resources: Nova Scotia
* Winner, Mala Davis Book Award (Fishing Cove School, North Kingstown, RI)
* WInner of the National Parenting Publications Award
* Featured on the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website (Apr. 2009)
*Author and Lemon appeared at the Rhode Island State House to kick of MS Awareness Month (2009)
* Author and Lemon featured at the March Into Reading Event, at Salve Regina University in Newport, RI each year
* Featured on The Dodo website:

The Dodo